Donald Phillip Enright obituary photo
 
In Memory of

Donald Phillip Enright

March 30, 1929 - October 28, 2016

Obituary


Donald P. Enright, 87, of Denver, passed away October 28, 2016 at The Denver Hospice. Preceded in death by his wife of 50 years, Elizabeth; and survived by daughters, Dianne Enright (Donald Mathis) and Stephanie Stroud (Monte); and grandsons, Stephen and Benjamin. Mr. Enright was born in Greeley, Colorado. He retired from The Denver Museum of Natural History. He proudly served in the United States Marine Corp. Private services to be held at a later date.

In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorial contributions be made in Donald's name to:
The Denver...

Donald P. Enright, 87, of Denver, passed away October 28, 2016 at The Denver Hospice. Preceded in death by his wife of 50 years, Elizabeth; and survived by daughters, Dianne Enright (Donald Mathis) and Stephanie Stroud (Monte); and grandsons, Stephen and Benjamin. Mr. Enright was born in Greeley, Colorado. He retired from The Denver Museum of Natural History. He proudly served in the United States Marine Corp. Private services to be held at a later date.

In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorial contributions be made in Donald's name to:
The Denver Museum of Nature and Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80205; http://www.dmns.org

or to The Denver Hospice, 501 S Cherry St, Suite 700, Denver, CO 80246
http://www.thedenverhospice.org/

Don was a solitary traveler on life's journey. Born the only child to Donald and Sybil Enright in Greeley, Colorado at the peak of the Great Depression, he became an astute observer of the world around him; the suffering of others, the power of love to ease suffering, and the spiritual strength afforded by the arts and nature.

He became an avid reader and music aficionado at a young age. He often spoke of the effects certain works had on him: the writings of Jack London and various authors of historical fiction; the sonorous strains of the big bands of the swing era; classic movies from the Golden Age of Hollywood; and plays, symphonies, and musicals he attended with his wife, daughters, and grandsons. His favorite activities during his years were reading and listening to music in his backyard sanctuary, known as Club Enright.

His parents divorced when he was a young child. As a result, he spent much of his childhood in the care of his maternal grandparents, John and Annie Chesnutt in Evans and Greeley, Colorado. He was also fortunate to have loving uncles and aunts on his dad's side to care for him, i.e. Aunt Helen, Aunt Alberta, and Uncle Joe.

Don attended grade school at the elementary school which was part of the Colorado State Teacher's College (now University of Northern Colorado). His mother had attended college here and studied music, specializing in vocal performance, before she got married. Don remembered being seated at the back of one of his classrooms until the teacher discovered his enthusiasm for geography and history, at which point he was suddenly placed in the front row.

He had been living with his grandparents during this time while his mother worked in the retail fashion industry in Denver. We remember his mother as an elegant lady who was well-suited to this profession. When his mother married Sam Hopper, Don went to live with them on Gaylord Street in Denver. By this time he was in junior high school and he boarded the Colfax trolley every day for the ride to Gove Junior High School. He continued his secondary education at East High School. During this time he spent many happy hours "hanging out" at City Park, which is near the high school. City Park is a place that continued to fill him with joy through the years as he took his family there to feed the ducks, sled on the hills, and go for walks around the lake.

After high school, Don joined the Marines and served from 1946 to 1948 at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina and again from 1950 to 1952 in the Ninth Marine Corps Reserve District at Naval Station Great Lakes, Illinois.

During Don's time in the service, his mother lost her second husband in an automobile accident. She later married Frank Favata, from New Jersey. It was during one of their visits together to Lake Hopatcong in New Jersey that Don met Liz. She was sunbathing on the shore at her parent's vacation cabin as Don circled the lake in his boat, getting closer and closer to shore, until they finally met.

Whenever he could get leave from the service, he would arrange a rendezvous with her. They had many happy times meeting in Washington D.C, New Jersey, New York City, or Chicago. Don and Liz were married on August 1, 1952 in Denver, Colorado at St. John's Episcopal Church.

One year later, they were blessed with their first daughter, Dianne Patricia. Three and a half years later, the family grew with the addition of Stephanie Louise. They spent their early years as a family living in the basement of Sybil and Frank's house at 500 Colorado Blvd. He remembered these years as some of the best years of his life because not only was he happy, but his mother was happy too.

At this time, Don worked in sales for Colgate-Palmolive. He traveled the southern states and was gone almost 5 weeks at a time. It wasn't easy for Liz to be home taking care of two girls without him (although she did have the support of Sybil and Frank). So, he quit Colgate-Palmolive and went to work at United Airlines as a Current Day Load Planner, which entailed keeping track of the weight capacity of airplanes. This was similar to the work he did in the service during his time in Illinois when he was responsible for regulating the cargo aboard ships.

While he was working at United Airlines, Don and Liz purchased a home close to Stapleton Airport. Don went on to work for a trucking company, the Denver Parks and Recreation Division, and finally settled into his favorite job as Building Operations Planner at the Denver Museum of Natural History. With his limitless thirst for knowledge, he enjoyed roaming the halls of the museum at night and reading about every display in the museum. On occasion, he was able to take his daughters to work with him and go behind the scenes for a close up view of the exhibits.

Liz returned to work at Frontier Airlines when both girls were attending elementary school. Her job with Frontier allowed the family to travel together frequently. The enjoyed yearly visits to New Jersey to visit with Liz's family, and enjoyed trips together to Mexico, Spain, Germany, France, Curacao, and Florida.

Donald and Elizabeth raised their daughters to become strong, independent, and loving women. Dianne went on to become a teacher in Oregon and married Donald Mathis. Stephanie stayed in Denver, married Monte Stroud, and they raised two sons, Stephen and Benjamin. Don and Liz enjoyed many trips to Oregon to visit Dianne and Don. At home in Denver, they enjoyed time spent with their grandsons (holidays, ball games, swim meets, choir performances, orchestra performances, and graduations).

After almost 40 years of marriage, Liz became seriously ill and Don acted as a gentle and loving caregiver for more than 10 years. They were able to celebrate their 50th anniversary before she passed away in 2003.

Several years later, Don's health began to decline. He was able to remain in his home to the end with the help of his daughters - especially Stephanie, who made sure he had food in the fridge and 4 new books to listen to every two weeks.

His final days were spent at the Denver Hospice Center at Lowry with Dianne and Stephanie keeping vigil through his waning days. He was still asking Stephanie to get him more books to listen to and asking Dianne to get him some chocolate to eat. The family would like to acknowledge the superb care given to Donald by the staff at the Denver Hospice Center. We are so grateful for the comfort they provided him and the support they provided for us.